Online Class: End of Life Care


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  • 11
    Lessons
  • 12
    Exams &
    Assignments
  • 4
    Hours
    average time
  • 0.4
    CEUs
  • 417
    Students
    have taken this course
 
 
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Course Description

When it comes to end of life care there are many issues that the patient and family members will go through emotionally, physically, and spiritually. At the very moment a patient is diagnosed with a serious illness, everyone is left with questions, concerns, sadness, and more. While this is a very difficult time, it is going to be very important that the patient and family members plan and prepare for what lies ahead.

The planning process includes everything, like where the patient will receive care, who will care for the patient, what types of treatment they desire and for how long, who will make decisions if they are unable to, what will happen to their assets, who will have custody of their children, and so much more. Since so many questions are left unanswered, the process is even more difficult and yet it is still so important to begin answering all of these questions as soon as possible.

During the patient's illness, the plan will need to be adjusted, but with good communication amongst all of the involved parties--along with teamwork and honesty--everyone can effectively work together with the patient to ensure that the last months of the patient's life are as positive as possible.

When a person realizes that they are coming to the end of their life, they will experience a wide range of emotions and feelings. Just as caretakers will find it hard to deal with the situation's reality, patients will find it even more difficult. The patient, family members and friends will experience all of these feelings and emotions in different ways, at different times. It is important to consider that everyone is different, and therefore will handle things differently. Same goes for how the patient and family members will cope. Some will cry, while others will confide in a friend. What is important is that coping does take place, even if it's not recognizable.

Since the patient will be experiencing an array of emotions, it will be crucial to help them find support. This also applies for the patient's family members. Although the feelings listed previously are normal, they can be eased with the help of proper support. If untreated and ignored, it can lead to severe depression. Everyone finds support in doing different things. For example, some will attend church, while others attend support groups. Some will exercise to release anger, while others will get out and socialize with friends. Regardless of how you choose to deal with your illness or your family member's illness, the important thing is that you find something that helps. Finding ways to cope is a very important part of dealing with end of life care because it helps us to face what lies ahead. 
 

Worry and Anxiety

Many people will worry and have anxiety about what will happen after they are gone, for example, if they have children. Family members will also worry about what they will do without their loved one, and worry or have anxiety over whether they have done or will do the right thing.
 
Sadness & Anger
 
It is only natural for a patient to be sad about their current situation. They may also be angry that their life has been cut short, or why it is them who have to suffer through an illness. Caretakers, family members, and friends will also feel angry and sadness because of what is happening to their loved one and angry about the reality that nothing can be done about it. Many people feel powerless or helpless against the situation causing feelings of anger and sadness.
 

Disbelief & Denial

People will also be in disbelief and cannot believe that this is happening to themselves or their loved one. They feel that maybe there has been some sort of mistake or that things can get better. Some people will deny that they are ill or don't believe that it has happened to them.

Bargaining

Sometimes when a person is diagnosed with a terminal illness, or when they simply face the end of life, they and family members as well, may bargain. Whomever they speak to spiritually, they may try to bargain in hopes that if they are healed, they will keep a promise they have made in return.  A family member will also bargain in hopes that their loved one will be healed.

Bitterness & Resentment

When we realize that we cannot bargain, we may start to feel resentful towards things such as God, the patient, or even ourselves. This is because we feel as though we have been abandoned and feelings of being alone make us resent whomever we may choose to "blame."

Guilt

Patients may at times feel guilty. Perhaps they wish they have done something differently as they begin to reflect on the past. Loved ones can also feel guilty during and after their loved one is gone. They too may reflect on how they should have, could have, or did treat their loved one.

Depression

The patient may have feelings of depression once the reality of their fate has set in. Many loved ones, friends, and caretakers will also experience this during and after their loved one is gone.

Impatience

Many patients will be angry and impatient that they are in pain and suffering. They may show this by acting out their anger or by shutting their loved ones out. Family members may also grow impatient because they are witnessing the suffering of their loved one. 
 

Learning Ways to Cope

Expressing & Acknowledging

It is important that you explore the emotions that you are feeling, express them by sharing them, and acknowledge why you are feeling a certain way. Whether you work through them with a close group of friends, family members, a counselor, or a support group, it is up to you. When emotions linger without being expressed, they will be buried and more  healthy emotions, such as acceptance and healing, cannot occur. If you are the patient or the family member, this must be done to move on.

Caring for Yourself

Coping with the situation cannot occur if you do not properly care for yourself. When patients and family members face end of life care many things will exhaust them physically, mentally, and spiritually. That is why it is important to take care of yourself in all these areas. For example, proper rest, food consumption, finding the right support, and so on, are necessary for everyone.

Confiding

When coping, it is important to find the individual in which you feel most comfortable confiding in. Perhaps it is your sister, a spiritual advisor, a best friend, etc. No matter whom it is, find them and communicate with them what you feel often. This applies to both the patient and their family members.

Crying & Laughing

Although crying in this case will be caused from confusion, anger, and sadness, always remember that it is good to cry, and it is alright to do so. While some will sob in private, others will need a shoulder to lean on. Crying will help you to cope with the situation. It helps to release emotions which are necessary. Laughing is also ok and will be good for you! Never be afraid to laugh as you reminisce and share stories. It is good for both the patient and family members.

Speak From the Heart

Most of all, if you're loved one is still here, whether or not you think they can hear you, always speak what is within your heart. Chances are they can hear what you are saying even if you think they cannot. It is important to tell your loved one what you are feeling.

How these suggestions help

If we do not cope or express our emotions, our behavior can be negatively impacted. This may cause some regrets in the long run which will impact you negatively. With these various suggestions, although certain emotions may never fully go away, you can make the end of life process go as well as it possibly can.
  • Completely Online
  • Self-Paced
  • Printable Lessons
  • Full HD Video
  • 6 Months to Complete
  • 24/7 Availability
  • Start Anytime
  • PC & Mac Compatible
  • Android & iOS Friendly
  • Accredited CEUs
Universal Class is an IACET Accredited Provider
 
 

Course Lessons

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Lesson 1: Emotions & Coping: Patients and Family Members

When a person has come to realize that they are coming to the end of their life, they will experience a wide range of emotions and feelings. 10 Total Points
  • Lesson 1 Video
  • Review 2 Articles: End of Life: Questions and Answers; End of Life Coping
  • Take Poll: End of Life Course
  • Complete Exam: Lesson 1: Emotions & Coping: Patients and Family Members

Lesson 2: Communication

Good communication will be crucial when dealing with end of life care. 10 Total Points
  • Lesson 2 Video
  • Review 2 Articles: Talking about Death; Communicating with the Dying
  • Complete Exam: Lesson 2: Communication

Lesson 3: Patient Planning/ End of Life Planning

It is impossible for someone to know their time and place of death; however, if you know it will be soon, there are things that can be done to plan for what lies ahead. 9 Total Points
  • Lesson 3 Video
  • Review 2 Articles: Planning for Dying Wishes; Estate Planning
  • Take Poll: End of Life Planning
  • Complete Exam: Lesson 3: Patient Planning/ End of Life Planning

Lesson 4: Physical Symptoms & Pain Management

Depending on the patient's illness, they can have a variety of different symptoms. 10 Total Points
  • Lesson 4 Video
  • Review 2 Articles: The Dying Process; Signs of Approaching Death
  • Complete Exam: Lesson 4: Physical Symptoms & Pain Management

Lesson 5: In Home Care

Many patients will decide that they would like to remain within the home with their loved ones and be cared for by them. 10 Total Points
  • Lesson 5 Video
  • Review Article: Dying at Home
  • Complete Exam: Lesson 5: In Home Care

Lesson 6: Palliative Care

Many patients and family members are not sure what palliative care is exactly. They may be unsure of how it can help, who is involved, when this type of care is appropriate, and so on. 10 Total Points
  • Lesson 6 Video
  • Review Article: What is palliative care?
  • Complete Exam: Lesson 6: Palliative Care

Lesson 7: Hospice

The concept of Hospice dates all the back to 1967 and served the purpose of offering a place for travelers who fell ill during their journey. 10 Total Points
  • Lesson 7 Video
  • Review 2 Articles: Hospice Foundation of America; Hospice Care
  • Complete Exam: Lesson 7: Hospice

Lesson 8: Hospitals & Nursing Homes

Often times a patient will make the decision to either remain in the hospital during end of life care or reside within a nursing home. 10 Total Points
  • Lesson 8 Video
  • Review Article: A Dignified End of Life
  • Take Poll: End of Life Care
  • Complete Exam: Lesson 8: Hospitals & Nursing Homes

Lesson 9: Refusing Care

Sometimes a patient will refuse certain types, or all types of care. Because of the seriousness of that decision it is important to understand the treatment in which they are refusing. 10 Total Points
  • Lesson 9 Video
  • Complete Exam: Lesson 9: Refusing Care

Lesson 10: Legal & Financial Plans

There are many legal aspects that the patient and family members will need to consider such as estate and financial planning. 10 Total Points
  • Lesson 10 Video
  • Review 2 Articles: Coping Financially; End of Life Decision Making
  • Complete Exam: Lesson 10: Legal & Financial Plans

Lesson 11: After the Patient is Gone

After the patient is gone loved ones of the patient will go through various emotions and will cope in different ways. 60 Total Points
  • Lesson 11 Video
  • Review 2 Articles: Coping with Grief and Loss; Funeral Costs
  • Take Poll: Final Course Poll - Your Opinion
  • Take Survey: Program Evaluation Follow-up Survey (End of Course)
  • Complete Exam: Lesson 11: After the Patient is Gone
  • Complete: The Final Exam
159
Total Course Points
 

Learning Outcomes

By successfully completing this course, students will be able to:
  • Recognize emotions and coping skills.
  • Describe communication techniques and etiquette when faced with an end of life care situation.
  • Know patient planning/end of life planning procedures.
  • Describe physical symptoms and pain management techniques.
  • Describe in home care.
  • Describe palliative care.
  • Describe hospice care.
  • Identify hospitals and nursing homes and end of life care.
  • Identify situations when patients refuse care.
  • Know legal and financial plans in end of life care issues.
  • Know what needs to be done and how to cope after the patient is gone, and
  • Demonstrate mastery of lesson content at levels of 70% or higher.
 

Additional Course Information

Online CEU Certificate
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Document Your CEUs on Your Resume
 
Course Title: End of Life Care
Course Number: 7550524
Languages: English - United States, Canada and other English speaking countries
Category:
Course Type: General Education (Self-Paced, Online Class)
CEU Value: 0.4 IACET CEUs (Continuing Education Units)
CE Accreditation: Universal Class, Inc. has been accredited as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET).
Grading Policy: Earn a final grade of 70% or higher to receive an online/downloadable CEU Certification documenting CEUs earned.
Assessment Method: Lesson assignments and review exams
Instructor: Cheryl Reinerio, RN, BC, MSN
Syllabus: View Syllabus
Duration: Continuous: Enroll anytime!
Course Fee: $50.00 (no CEU Certification) || with Online CEU Certification: $75.00

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